Our club meets

Every 2nd Tuesday evening except holidays and summer.

Our new meeting location as of May 2, 2017 is:

Kennebecasis Valley Oasis Youth Centre, 26 Pettingill Road, Quispamsis, NB E2E 3R6

7:00 pm - 9:05 pm on
May 2, 16 & 30
June 13 & 27
September 12 & 26
October 10 & 24
November 7 & 21
December 5 & 19

We'd love to meet you.

There are no meetings on storm days.

View Google maps location.

Contact a member.

Overview of Meeting Roles

The following information is meant as a general overview of your meeting role. For more indepth information, please view any additional materials noted at the end of the appropriate section.

Chair

This role is the most important and time consuming position in the meeting. It requires a lot of preparation to see that a meeting meets Toastmaster standards.

The main duty of the Chair is to ensure that the meeting runs according to plan. The Chair introduces the various sections of the meeting, runs the business section, and introduces the Table Topics Master, Toastmaster and General Evaluator. At the end of the meeting, the Chair ensures that the meeting awards are handed out, as well as making sure that the roles for the next meeting are assigned and understood. Chair's Meeting Template (Word format)

Toastmaster

The Toastmaster controls the prepared speech section. The Toastmaster introduces this portion, explains the Toastmaster program (if there is time, usually in more detail if there are guests in attendance) and then introduces each speaker. After the last speaker, the Toastmaster returns control of the meeting back to the Chair. More on the Toastmaster Role (PDF format)

Table Topics Master

Table topics is the portion of the meeting where people who are not involved in other parts of the meeting get a chance to speak. They have to answer (within a 1-2 minute time frame) a question posed to them by the Table Topics Master. The purpose of this is to help members think on their feet.

The Table Topics Master prepares and issues the topics and also sets the theme for the meeting. Most Table Topics Masters try and choose questions that promote fun, are newsworthy, or are seasonal. An effective Table Topics Master will make sure that those members who do not have a major role in the meeting are first asked a question. The chair and speakers should be the last people asked to answer a question. The mark of an experienced Table Topics master is the ability to "connect" two speakers by commenting briefly on the previous answer and then smoothly linking (or bridging) that answer to the next question. Table Topics Ideas | More Table Topics Ideas

General Evaluator

The General Evaluator keeps track of every thing that happens during the meeting - from what time it starts, to how well each role is filled to whether the room is too hot or too cold. At the end of the meeting, the General Evaluator points out both what went well and what didn't go as well. General Evaluator Form (PDF format)

When reporting on what you do at the beginning of the meeting, make sure that you mention the why, what and when. Why this duty is important. What you do. And when you will report on it. The report is most effective if it ties into the theme of the meeting.

Speech Evaluators

Each speaker has an evaluator. The speech evaluators acquaint themselves with the goals of the speech and then judge how well the speaker met those goals, making comments in the speaker's manual. Encouragement and helpful feedback are given at the end of the meeting. You will use the appropriate evaluation form in the manual. Also check out the Speaker Evaluation Form (PDF format)

Ah Counter

The Ah Counter keeps track of all the words and sounds that are used as pause fillers by members during the meeting. These words may be actual "ahs" or they may be words such as: well, you know, and or so. At the end of the meeting the Ah Counter may either report on which members used the most filler words or which members used no filler words. More on the Ah Counter Role (PDF format) | Ah Counter Form (PDF format)

When reporting on what you do at the beginning of the meeting, make sure that you mention the why, what and when. Why this duty is important. What you do. And when you will report on it. The report is most effective if it ties into the theme of the meeting.

Grammarian

The Grammarian has two main duties: to introduce an new word to members and encourage them to use it during the meeting; and to record and comment on either inappropriate or exemplary uses of the English language. Similies, metaphors and alliteration should be noted as effective examples of English language usage. Unfortunately, sometimes inexperienced Grammarians wrongly pick as an example of good grammar a tired saying such as "it was raining cats and dogs." This is an example of poor English usage, not good. Instead of recycling other people's phrases, speakers should come up with their own sayings. For instance, 2004 World Champion of Public Speaking, Randy J. Harvey commented to a club member: You're more fun that a burlap bag full of bunnies. This phrasing combines alliteration with imagery and is a noteworthy example of exemplary English language usage.

When reporting on what you do at the beginning of the meeting, make sure that you mention the why, what and when. Why this duty is important. What you do. And when you will report on it. The report is most effective if it ties into the theme of the meeting.

Timer

The timer keeps track of time. Different sections within the meeting have different time limits. Each speech has an acceptable time frame, as does each table topics answer. It is the timer's responsibility to keep track of the time, correctly set the timing machine to signal the speakers regarding how much time they have left, and, if required, inform the Chair when time limits for a certain meeting segment have been met.

When reporting on what you do at the beginning of the meeting, make sure that you mention the why, what and when. Why this duty is important. What you do and how you do it. And when you will report on it. The report is most effective if it ties into the theme of the meeting.

The timer gives a report at the end of the meeting as to how well the time limits were met. Timing Form (PDF format)

Invocation

The person giving the invocation at the beginning of the meeting composes and then presents a non-denominational invocation at the beginning of the meeting. You should NOT say "Amen" at the end of the invocation. Suitable quotations or thoughts of the day that refer to the meeting theme are an effective means of presenting an invocation. Sample Invocations

Awards Master

You're in charge of counting votes to determine who wins the speaking awards for that meeting. Before the meeting begins, get the ribbons to be awarded at the close of the meeting. If there are at least three speeches, you'll need Best Table Topics, Best Evaluator, and Best Speaker. You will also want to choose one of: Best Gestures, Best Humour, or Most Enthusiasm.

Some clubs never reveal that there was a close vote. Kennebecasis Toastmasters does the opposite. It does much for morale and motivation of other club members to know they did well. So do mention if it was a close race. Also, instead of being a tie-breaker, if there is a tie, award two ribbons. Again, this helps club morale and motivates members better than just awarding one ribbon.

In stating what you will be doing during the meeting, be sure to stress the why as well as the how and when.

Joke Master

The role of the Joke Master is to find a suitable joke and then present it at the appropriate time - usually the end of the first half of the meeting, immediately prior to the break. Finding appropriate jokes, and then telling them well is a much harder task than it would appear at first glance. If possible, memorize your joke.